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He is a local Syrian refugee, along with his family

He is a local Syrian refugee, along with his family

Aubre Martin

Aubre Martin

He is a local Syrian refugee, along with his family

Jolene Janus, Staff Reporter

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Meet Abdo and Mohamad Alhamsho, Green Mountain’s first Syrian refugees. The ninth and tenth grade brothers traveled from Syria to Colorado to escape the war-torn chaos and death that awaited them in their homeland. They traveled

with their family of five that includes the two brothers, one sister, and their parents. They came in just a few days before the immigration ban took place, which barred all citizens from Syria, Iraq, Iran, Yemen, Libya, Somalia, and Sudan.

The war-torn country’s predicament is dire. “War. There’s nothing else but war,” explained Mohamad. So the family fled to America, looking for safety and opportunities. Their flight was especially vital to the children of the family. Many of the schools in Syria are no longer functional; they’ve been bombed and shut down, or used as emergency places to stay because of the war.  For the first time in four years, they can now attend school. So the two brothers are currently working hard to catch up to speed with their studies. Barry described these next few years as, “These years are transition for them. It’s going to take some time for them to catch up with the language and the grades.”

The ninth grader dreams of becoming a police officer, a motorcycle cop to be specific. So after graduating Green Mountain, he plans on studying in college. When he can, he’ll get his driver’s license for his future career. Currently, Mohamad enjoys swimming in his free time and plans to join the swim team.

He likes it here. Nothing was hard about moving here. It was the just the “interviews with people” that he had to do to enable him to live here. The rest of his family, including, as he describes, that his, “grandpa and uncle, [aunts,] and lots of family are still back there. Some are in Turkey, but the majority are stuck in Syria.”

The family is staying in Colorado on a one year visa, which works by extending its time-span year by year based on the situation back in their homeland. Essentially, if the war is still going on or the country is deemed to dangerous, then the visa will be extended. The family lies in uncertainty, but as Barry noted, “I don’t see the situation in Syria getting any better soon.”

Let us welcome them with open arms.

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A Long Ways From Home