GMHS Clubs: Behind the Scenes

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GMHS Clubs: Behind the Scenes

Raniya Digankar and Madeline Spragins

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Sources of Strength is a student-led program that seeks to help prevent suicide by reaching out to others and promoting healthy practices. The program is focused on eight elements: mental health, family support, positive friends, mentors, healthy activities, generosity, spirituality, and medical access. According to the sourcesofstrength.org, the program has been shown to “increase peer leaders’ connectedness to adults, increase peer leaders’ school engagement, and increase positive perception.” Sources of Strength is a great way to be involved in a group that cares about the well-being of others and reach out to people who need help.

Future Farmers of America (FFA) is an intracurricular organization for students who are interested in pursuing a career in agriculture, or just interested in learning more about agriculture and its effects in our society. FFA not only welcomes aspiring farmers, but also future teachers, scientists, doctors, business owners, and more. According to the official FFA website, it “remains committed to the individual student, providing a path to achievement in premier leadership, personal growth, and career success through agricultural education.” This program is a fantastic way to get involved in agriculture and to learn leadership and entrepreneur skills.

B.I.O.N.I.C is a new club that joined GMHS’s list of clubs this semester, but the first B.I.O.N.I.C. team was in fact started by school counselor Sandy Austin in the 2004-05 school year at GMHS in response to four suicides of students at our school a couple of years earlier. The club’s goal is to help people say “Believe It Or Not I Care” with their lives! According to the official B.I.O.N.I.C. website, “the B.I.O.N.I.C. Team empowers people to reach out to students going through similar tough times to let them know they are “seen,” “valued,” and “cared for” in hopes of preventing them from spiraling down into more serious issues.” Some examples of their goals include making new students feel welcome, reaching out to hospitalized students or students with extended illnesses/health conditions, reaching out to students and staff that experience the death of a loved one, reaching out to schools that experience tragedies, and empowering bystanders to prevent bullying.